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20121226
20130103
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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
, science changes. nothing is more worthless than a science textbook from the '50s. >> but what shouldn't change from the original constitution of america, surely. >> my faith isn't based on the constitution, it's based on -- >> i get that. but america in terms of its populism, it's about fairness and equality. i went to see "lincoln" the movie a few weeks ago. it was a riveting movie, daniel day lewis is brilliant as lincoln. but all about how he fought in his last few months as president to get slavery apolished. there were millions of americans who thought slavery was perfectly acceptable. who was outraged at what he was doing. he was not trying to make something popular at the moment. he knew instinctively it was just wrong, unfair, unequal. >> and why did he know that? because it's in the bible. >> right, but we had this discussion. >> it's in the bible. he was building it on biblical truth. the bible says every man should be free. >> but you don't believe every man should be free and equal? >> of course we're free and of course we're equal. you can love anybody you want to. >> but
look at a science story that captured headlines this year. the federal government has taken new steps to limit some of the research it does with chimpanzees, which have long been the source of hope and debate. but questions remain about whether those experiments should occur under any circumstances. "newshour" science correspondent miles o'brien reports. >> reporter: there are no other animals quite like them, except us. they share 99% of our d.n.a. and it shows. they scheme, plot and fight. they care for their babies and they grieve their dead. and they love a good game of catch. as i discovered, queenie had little patience for my wild pitches. >> did you see her stomp her foot? >> reporter: she's very mad at me. those very similarities are at the core of a heated debate over whether scientists should keep using chimpanzees for scientific and medical research. do we owe our cousins something more? here, they say we do. welcome to chimp haven, near shreveport louisiana, a 200-acre oasis of tall trees and hidden daily treats for about 130 chimpanzees. haven co-founder amy fultz put me
or gay rights or whatever. even in the medical sciences there is discrimination. so it turns out that more women die of heart disease now than all cancers combined. more women die of heart disease rather than men, more women than men die of heart disease. did you know that? i was so shocked by some of these statistics. >> until i researched this interview and i saw why you were so strong about it. >> right. >> it's startling. >> 50 years of research have been done on men. i'll tell you a funny story, too. you realize how powerful females are, okay? that even in the research, a woman doctor discovered how to grow a heart from stem cells in, you know, in a petri dish, whatever. how did she do it? you know how she did it? with only female stem cells because literally the male stem cells got lost. like in life. and they refused to ask for directions. now, this is true. can you imagine that? so i just believe, you know, breast cancer has done such a magnificent job raising millions and millions of dollars to help that disease, but let's say 39,520 women died of breast cancer in the la
what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. bikes and balloons, wholesome noodles on spoons. a kite, a breeze, a dunk of grilled cheese. catches and throws, and spaghettio's. that's what happy kids are made of. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >>> we're back with more on that breaking news. secretary of state hillary clinton has been released from the hospital. this is new video of clinton's motorcade leaving the hospital just a short time ago. she had been there since sunday recovering from a blood clot in her head. doctors now say she's making good progress on all fronts and they're confident she'll make a good recovery. this is great news. and now that mrs. clinton is out of the hospital, we're waiting on an apology from the right wing. after news broke two weeks ago that clinton suffered a concussion after fainting, they went on the attack. >> you don't want to go to a meeting or a conference or an event, you have a diplomatic illness. >> why don't we apply the same standards we apply to school kids. i want to see a doc
the most aboard climate science is going on. these are the most destructive fires in colorado history and they come after the warmest weather ever recorded. you could do the same exercise all over the planet. this is what it looks like as the planet begins -- and i underline begins -- to warm pita mohamed mursi had been declared the winner in each presidential race. >> we will respect agreements and international law as well as egyptian commitments and treaties with the rest of the world. >> to talk about the significance of election, we are joined by sharif of del produce. >> the first democratically elected in egypt's history. his win marks a victory over the lingering remnants of mubarak's regime. >> chief justice john roberts prove to be the surprise deciding vote. joining with the court's liberal members. >> the highest court in the land has not spoken. we will continue to implement this law and we will work together to improve on where we can. >> me state the positive first. this really is a huge victory for our side. in spite of all of my concerns with this law, it did not go f
universities and allow more education in science and mathematics in the school system which would allow more people to do research in this field. to allow more electric energy instead of so much depending on petroleum and oil. guest: about the education system. the second question is about the role of private enterprise in these technologies. education is the silver bullet and the thing that we can do most cheaply and easily to get kids excited about solving big problems. it needs to begin not in universities but at elementary and high school level education. every year we choose 35 young innovators who we believe have the greatest capacity to change the world. this year most of the 35 lived and worked in the united states, less than five had gone to elementary school in the united states. they came from china, europe, israel. we are not doing a good job in the states in making science and technology a profitable activity, where kids can commit their entire lives and careers to it. the best thing we can do is to invest in science and technology and mathematics education in our elementary and
. and they're not addressing the real problems of america, which are jobs, productivity, education, science research, and withering infrastructure. this is appalling, and the american people should watch whatever's happening with a sense of disgust. >> you feel clearly very strongly. >> yes. >> why do you think we've got to this stage? what could turn it into a more positive narrative? >> i think we are at this place because the role of muddle in politics has overwhelmed, the lobbying process has overwhelmed the sound financial planning for the american people. we have a mess in the health care spending in the out years, which is real. but the costs of providing medical care through pharmaceutical monopolies, insurance monopolies and hospitalization monopolies means american people pays more than double what the rest of the people pay in the world. we're not fixing that. >> diana, is that your assessment of what we witnessed today? >> we are not making real attempts to cut spending, which is the problem. we have $16 trillion in debt. $1 trillion deficit. and what we're talking about today i
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)